Mosiah 7 - 10

May 11, 2024 00:35:26
Mosiah 7 - 10
Weekly Deep Dive: A Come Follow Me Podcast
Mosiah 7 - 10

May 11 2024 | 00:35:26

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Show Notes

The incredible miracle of relocating an entire nation. Timeline of the people of Zeniff. How can we let wisdom govern us today?
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Episode Transcript

[00:00:15] Speaker A: Hey, welcome back to the weekly Deep dive podcast on the add on Education network. The podcast where we take a look at the weekly come follow me discussions and try to add a little insight and unique perspective. I am your host, Jason Lloyd. Here in the studio with our friend and this show is producer Nate Pfeiffer. [00:00:30] Speaker B: Sup? [00:00:31] Speaker A: Hey. I know we had a few of our listeners worried, like, what happened to us? Are we okay? We're good. We're good. We just had kind of a, what would you call it? Perfect storm. Nate had a concert going on this weekend. I had a conference down in California, had attend. So, yeah, it was a bit of. [00:00:49] Speaker B: A rough weekend to get together, but we're back. [00:00:51] Speaker A: We're back. We try to get this content out to you every week and we will continue to do so and try so. But thank you for your patience. We're healthy, we're fine, and we're recording again. So thanks for listening and thanks for being patient. This week we're going to go into Mosiah, chapters seven through ten. This is after King Benjamin's speech. The throne is passed on to Mosiah. Mosiah is eager to know what's going on with the people that went up into or went back to the land of Nephi. And so he sends Ammon and his crew down into the territory to find out what they can find out, and they're immediately captured. And that's kind of the story that we're picking up today. Next week, we're going to get into a binadai. So let's get into Zenith's people, their departure, and see what we can glean and learn from this week's lessons. First off, Zenith kind of comes off, I think, as thinking pretty high of himself. He's a little bit. I don't know. I don't know the best way to put this. Well, let's look at this record. So I'm going to jump around a little bit. We're going to start in chapter nine, and then we're going to actually bounce backwards into seven. Spend a lot of time in there. But in chapter nine, as you know, the heading here, the record of Zenith as an account of his people from the time that they left the land of Zarahemla until the time that they were delivered out of the hands of the Lamanites, compromising nine through 22 inclusively. So what we have is a little, almost like we had the small book of Nephi. We have another record here that Moroni sticks into his record to find out what happened. With this people that disappeared. And it's important to know the timeline of this as well. Zenith leaves during Mosiah, the first reign, and then we're going to get Benjamin, and then we're going to get Mosiah, and then we come back. So a couple generations have passed from when Zenith left to where they're reunited. In this record, you'll notice it starts off verse one, I, Zenaph, having been taught in all the language of. And instead of saying my fathers, it says the Nephites. But, you know, we're 400 years later, and yet the intro to this doesn't sound very different. And this intro in the beginning, it's copying Nephi, right? But 400 years later, and understanding that each person that takes Nephi's spot is called Nephi. And it's the line of the lineage of the kings, the reigning. It's almost like Zenith is setting himself up right at the beginning to be a king. And he does become a king, right? He rules over his people. And this is kind of his introduction to his rule and his reign. And he talks about this, and I just want you to notice how many times, like, I might spy out the people that I was desirous, therefore I did this I would. That a ruler should make, and I should, and I was overzealous. And it goes on and on. If I go into chapter ten and I caused that, there should be weapons of war made that thereby I might have weapons for my people. And I set guards round about the land. And I did guard my people. And it came to pass that verse four. And I did cause the men that they should till and I did cause the women that. And I did. And I. He takes. That's a lot of credit. It almost kind of gets old a little bit. And even at the end he says, and even I. Yes, even I in my old age, to take up the sword, to go defend this people and to deliver them once again. So I. I don't know. [00:04:23] Speaker B: Have we not seen anything like this to this point? [00:04:26] Speaker A: Maybe we have. Maybe I'm being unfair to Zenith. It just comes across like there's no. [00:04:33] Speaker B: I in team, dude. If there isn't, I wish you would stop talking about yourself. [00:04:38] Speaker A: It feels like that. And he does give credit to the Lord. [00:04:42] Speaker B: That's good. [00:04:43] Speaker A: But he sure. And I think that kind of helps explain things when he's going down there, he's not even the leader of his group, but he takes issue with the guy that is. And they fight, and he's triumphant, goes back and gets a new group. So even looking at that very beginning, that rub, it's my way or the highway type thing, I think all of those eyes kind of help us even understand that conflict in the wilderness to begin with. All right. Something else that I wanted to point out, as this group is coming down to inherit this land, remember, the Nephites lived in the land of Nephi. And then Mosiah, being warned in the dream, takes his people on this exodus to go find. He goes and finds the land of Zarahemla. I want to focus on the miracle that is, that it's not the same as Nephi taking his family and crossing the seas, or even Lehi, I guess, is what I should say. It's not the same as the mulokites coming over. In my mind, it's a lot different. Because you'll notice in here, it keeps talking about the land of Lehi Dash Nephi. And you're like, wait a second. Is it the land of Nephi or the land of Lehidash? Nephi. And when Zenith gets down to the land of Nephi and he talks to king Laman, king Laman gives him two cities, Shemlon and Lehi Dash Nephi. And so it sounds to me like Lehi Nephi is one of the cities in the land of Nephi. So the land of Nephi, it's not just a city. It's not just a big city. We're talking about the evacuation of an entire nation. And so when Mosiah flees the land of Nephi, you're talking about several significant cities and a whole, I mean, 400 years worth of people leaving the land. It's not 16 people. It's not 100 people. You're talking about thousands of people. And something that I've noticed when I'm reading through these chapters, when Zenith's people gets overrun by the Lamanites and they get stuck, they try to send out an escape party to go find the land of Zarahemla, to go get help, reinforcements to help save them from the Lamanites, what happens to that party? They get lost. When Mosiah sends out the troops and he sends Ammon down with this group of people to go find the people of Zenith, what happens to them? They get lost. And when Mosiah. Not Mosiah, when the Lamanites talking later on, when they find the people of Ammon and they go out into the wilderness and they get lost and they have to be relocated. So we have at least three separate stories of people getting lost in these lands. And not knowing where to go now, going back to Mosiah, who's leading this large number of people out there. The reason why I say this is different from Lehi's family, different from the Mulokites. If I'm responsible for not just a family, not just a city, but an entire nation, what's going to be waiting for me at the other end? What happens if Mosiah leads them into the land of desolation, where there's all these jaredites that are slain, or actually worse, they're still alive, and they get caught up in that bloodshed, they get caught up in that war, they get caught up in that destruction. But in any case, they find the land of Zarahamla in one shot, without getting lost. And I would say that that's to their salvation, because they find a massive city that can support this large migrant crowd. How else are you going to feed these people without crops, without some sort of infrastructure, without some sort of community that can receive them when they come in, otherwise, how do they survive? And the fact that Mosiah's group doesn't get lost in the wilderness, but they go straight to Zarahemla when everybody else can't seem to find their place in the land, I think speaks highly to the divine nature of his role and the guiding hand of God to be able to take his people straight to where they needed to be, when they needed to be there. That's what I wanted to say about Mosiah. Now, going into this people, I want to look at the timeline of events when they send out. So we have Zenith that corresponds with Mosiah the first, and then towards the end of his time, we're getting to Benjamin, and then we're going to get to Mosiah. What happens during Benjamin's reign is the Nephites get overrun, and we see that in the record with the zenith's people, with the large crowd of people that come through here. In fact, we even get to right before Mosiah, if we're trying to match up timelines with the people of Zenith and King Benjamin's speech. Noah and Benjamin are kings at the same time, which is significant because you're contrasting the reign of Benjamin, who supports his own self with the labors of his own hands, versus Noah, who's levying high taxes to try to support himself off of the labors of everybody else. These two kings are put at the same time with a good reason to try to compare and contrast those two. Now, you remember Gideon had issues with Noah and was chasing him with the sword. Noah had built all of these tall towers, or at least there was all these tall towers built by the people to try to see when the Lamanites were coming, because they had run ins with the Lamanites, occasionally knowing that they had come in there and captured their land. And when they get up to the tower and Gideon is about to slay Noah, they look out and they see a massive lamanite army. And so they stop what they're doing, grab all of their people, and go to flee. And this is where you get the women and the children that get left back behind and beg for their lives and kind of spared. So this massive lamanite army encounters little to no resistance. They're not fighting and engaging with these people. They grant them mercy. So they're going to keep going. This massive army is going to defeat Benjamin and the Nephites in Zarahemla. They're going to keep going. And the reason we say that they're defeat. We talked about this in our last episode. They lost the land of their inheritance. They lost Zarahemla, they lost all of that territory, all of that ground. And Benjamin becomes the hero of the day in being able to rally the Nephites to recapture all of that territory. So going back from the perspective of Zenaph and his people, you saw this massive army of Lamanites go through your land and keep going on the way out to zarahemla, and you have reason to suspect that the people of Zarahemla are done. So when he sends out 40 people to try to find the people of Zarahemla, to see what's going on and what their status is, they get lost. And maybe it's worth even commenting right now. When Mosiah sends Ammon to go find these people in the land of Nephi, Ammon's not a Nephite. He's never been to that land before in all of his life. And you think, why aren't they sending nephites down to the land of Nephi to go find it? But remember, we're three generations out, right? So it doesn't matter. None of the Nephites had been there either. Same thing when we're talking about the Nephites or sending people up to go find the land of Zarahemla, it doesn't matter. If they're Nephites looking for the zarahemla where they're not super familiar with it, you're talking about generations removed, where they're. It's easy for them to get lost. They're not super familiar with, with what that land looks like, who to expect, or what to find when they get up there. Instead of finding the Nephites, they find the Jaredites, and they find bodies and bones of animals, of people, swords that have rusted out, the hilts are gone. All that, all that's left is blades and breastplates. And they think that, that Zarahemla destroyed. They think that they've shown up after the Lamanites have had their war and all of these people have been wiped out. So they come back empty handed with reports that Zarahemla has been destroyed. And that's going to check up with what the king and the people saw with this massive lamanite army that swept up through and does end up kicking them out of the land of Zarahemla. So they do end up, the Nephites, losing that battle. But the people of Zenith are confused with the destruction that they see from the Jaredites and incorrectly report that all of the Nephites have been annihilated. So going back to the people of Zenith, they really do think that they're on an island, and they are the last nephite surviving period. That's why when Ammon shows up and they see him round about the city, they capture him, and he says, look, I came from Zarahemla. They're so surprised and shocked because they thought all the Nephites in the Zarahemla and the Mulekites, everyone had been annihilated and wiped out and destroyed. And that's where they get excited, and that's kind of where they get that feeling of joy. Cool. [00:14:11] Speaker B: I love it. Love it. [00:14:13] Speaker A: Yeah. Sorry, Nate, I haven't given you much. [00:14:15] Speaker B: No, I'm just listening. [00:14:18] Speaker A: Much bread to go off on here? [00:14:19] Speaker B: No, this is great. I'm in it. [00:14:22] Speaker A: This is. It's just. It's just kind of weird history on trying to piece all of this together because it comes across so disjointed. But let's see if we can find some, some valuable scriptures in some of this. Boy. Nate, did we talk about Mosiah finding seer stones? [00:14:39] Speaker B: No. Okay, now let's get in it. [00:14:44] Speaker A: Okay. So during this time period, Mosiah was obviously led by some sort of direction to get to Zarahamla, where he was. And I think there's reason to believe that he could have used the Liahona to get him there, just as Lehi's family used it to show up later on. But what we don't have, which is interesting, is any stories or references to the Liahona from here all the way into the end of the book of the Mormon, until Mormon takes them or Moroni takes them and buries them with the plates. So what happens with the liahona? Where does it come up from? Where does it go? And this is where Don Bradley has done a lot of work to try to piece this together in the last 116 pages, what was included and what we can get from there. And looking back at interviews at that time period, he says that Mosiah used the liahona to guide him, and it guided him to find the urim and thummim, these stones. And he didn't know what those stones were. He takes them back to the temple, and the Lord, from behind the veil, calls out and asks him, what is that that you're holding? And he has this exchange with the Lord where the Lord teaches him about the Yermun Thummim, how he's going to use it, which provides a little bit of continuity, because the Urim and Thummim show up throughout the Jaredite records. We hear it from the brother of Jared going into the mountain and making the stones and the finger of the Lord touching them and being guided by Urim and Thummim. And we see it playing a role in the end with Moroni. And we even see it with Mosiah being able to translate, and he's called a seer, who's able to see and translate using the Aram and Thummim. But how do we get from the Jaredite record to the Book of Mormon to the Nephites having these seer stones? And that's where Don Bradley is able to piece this back together. In the 116 pages, he says there was a story where Mosiah does go across, and he's coming across the jaredite lands. And to me, it's so fascinating. We are 400 years into history, and I don't think any of us ever correlate, Nephi or Jacob or Enos with the jaredites. We think the jaredites are long extinct. But the truth of the matter is, the jaredites were alive and well and fighting each other and coexisting with Enos, with Jacob, with Nephi. For 400 years, there were jaredites in the same geographic region as the Nephites. But that's how the Yemen thummim ends up getting into the hands of the Nephites. And this becomes more of a primary instrument, where the Liahona perhaps is just stored in an ark or a box and associated with the temple, a sacred relic that they use and hang on to, but not being used, common, everyday use anymore. [00:17:22] Speaker B: It's awesome. [00:17:24] Speaker A: Killer. All right. [00:17:26] Speaker B: Love it. [00:17:29] Speaker A: Let's keep going. Okay. I'm gonna read a few verses here at the end of chapter eight, verse 18. Thus, God has provided a means that man through faith might work many mighty miracles. Therefore, he becometh a great benefit to his fellow beings. And he's going to say a few things, in fact, before I even get to there, let's talk about. Let's talk about this. When Ammon finds these people, Zenif's people are so excited. It's King Liamhi at the time. And Limhi is excited because he says, we found these records. There's these 24 gold plates from the, from the Jaredites, and we don't know what it says. We desire that these would be translated into our language. Can you translate them? And I think that's a valid question, because remember, when the Nephites found the people of Zarahemla, they spoke a different language. And so when they find this record of this people that was wiped out in a language not familiar with themselves, I could see how they would assume that this would be the people of Zarahemla. And the Ammon coming in would have the ability to translate it, because this was the language that they spoke before they met with the. With the Nephites. But they were wrong in that this wasn't the language of the Mulokites, the people of Zarahemla. This was the record of the Jaredites going further back than that. And so he asks him if he knows anyone that can translate it, because he says that he can. And this is where he says that Mosiah can translate it. Now, this scripture gets quoted all the time, and this is where it's going to lead me to ask the question, which is greater, a seer or a prophet? And I think a lot of people quote this verse, and they say a seer is greater than a prophet because that's what it says in the Book of Mormon, right? When he says, mosiah has the urim and Thummim, and through the urim and Thummim, he can look through it and translate the records in verse 14 of chapter eight. And behold, the king of the people who are at the land of Zarahemla is the man who was commanded to do these things and has the high gift from God. And the king said, a seer is greater than a prophet. And I think people take that verse and kind of latch onto it. But if you notice, Ammon corrects him in verse 16, then Ammon said, a seer is a revelator and a prophet also, and a gift which is greater can no man have. And so he's kind of correcting him, I think, setting the record straight. He's not saying that a seer is greater than the prophet. That's the reaction that the king has when he hears what a wonderful gift he has. And then he's saying, no, a seer is a prophet, and no greater gift can a man have. And the gift of prophecy is a testimony of Jesus Christ. And to be able to have those things, and for what it's worth, even the hebrew word for seer really just means the same thing as the english seer is someone who sees a seer, a seer of things, who understands, who comprehends, who has that testimony. And so that's. I felt like that was worth kind of dragging in. All right. Going into the close of chapter eight, these verses I thought were interesting. Nate, maybe you can sound off on this and give us some insight. Verse 20. O, how marvelous are the works of the Lord, and how long doth he suffer with his people. Yea, and how blind and impenetrable are the understandings of the children of man. For they will not seek wisdom, neither do they desire that she should rule over them. And when they say she should rule over them, she is characterized as a female. Wisdom should rule over them. So that's something I don't think is unique to their day, that men refuse to have wisdom rule over them. [00:21:15] Speaker B: What do you think the alternative is? What do they. [00:21:20] Speaker A: I think sometimes we're quick to react, maybe emotionally based, maybe we get stoked up really quick, because this is my side. This is my right or I'm right. And we don't take time to maybe hear the other side out, or maybe we don't take time to try to understand what's being said or how things are being communicated. I think people, in their nature, sometimes it's quicker and easier to react than understand. Hmm. [00:21:49] Speaker B: Yeah, that's a good thought. I think that if you look at kind of the world that we live in now, I do think it's obviously very emotionally charged when we have opinions on things, but I think that it feels like always the, not the opposite, but the companion to wisdom is always knowledge or information. And I wonder if that's kind of what we have, that we feel like rules over us now is raw information. And there was, I've been preparing a two lessons and a church talk all coming up within the next two weeks. But one of the kind of the overriding themes that I feel like keeps coming to me is that you can always find what you're looking for. You can always find confirmation bias, by the way, within the church, too. Like, I'm not. I'm. This is not a critique of anybody outside of our religion. This is, I feel, just a universal fact at this point, which is, no matter what you believe, as crazy as it is, there is something out in the world to confirm that you have the right answer. I would suggest that not all things can be right or correct or true, especially things that. I mean, information that directly goes against other information out there. And with a sea of information out there with endless amounts of confirmation bias. I feel like we need wisdom to rule over us now more than ever, because wisdom is more than, I feel like, even correctly applying the knowledge. I feel like wisdom is being in touch enough with really the one true source of truth, which is the spirit or God. Having enough of a relationship where sometimes it's obvious, right. The world's flat. It's like, okay, well, you can find entire mass, groups of people, conventions, the whole thing, weird experiments and the whole thing. Right. You can find enough people out there that will be able to confirm that for most of us. I don't feel like we really need to pray about that, necessarily. Right. We can, I feel like, accurately look at the rest of the information that we have around us, no pun intended, in the world, and go, yeah, that's. That doesn't. [00:24:37] Speaker A: That. [00:24:37] Speaker B: That checks zero boxes for me. Right. That doesn't sit right on any level. And I think that that's a good way to start, I guess, kind of learning the process of this. But I feel like the idea of wisdom ruling us would be more directed at the subtle things, the nuances, when we actually do try to find people to vote for or issues to campaign for or to spend our time and energy doing or things going on in the lives of our children. Things going. You see what I mean? Like those types of things where there's so much more kind of nuance. And I sometimes mostly a lot more gray area than black and white. I feel like wisdom in these cases is taking the information available and instead of, like you said, emotionally reacting to the things that kind of get us up and fired up on stuff, instead going, let me try to let the spirit guide me through my decision making or through my beliefs or through my sorting out of this information and kind of helping me navigate my way through, you know, a lot of people, I feel like kind of demonize the Internet for the access to just unlimited amounts of misinformation or disinformation. It's like you always were able to find what you were looking for. It might have been a little bit harder, but I feel like as long as people have been trying to find the truth, you have the opposition of that, trying to mix or mingle the philosophies of men with scripture. Let's just say that, right. There's always been a counter to that. Yeah, now it's more accessible than ever. But I feel like once you kind of accept that, that you're going to get bombarded with information, I feel like it just is easier to almost see the opportunity in front of us to go, hey, what an amazing way then to go, hey, let me really hone in the one thing that I know I've been able to trust my entire life, which is that doesn't sit right in my gut. Like there's dissonance and now, okay, well, there's dissonance. That's my body reacting to that. That's the spirit reacting that whatever that is, right. There's something reacting in my body that's going, there's dissonance in this situation. What can I do to resolve that or to put, or to put those things back in harmony? Sometimes it's research more, get more information and kind of piece that together. Sometimes it's, hey, maybe you might not have all the information at hand. You're going to have to just kind of, you're going to have to go forward only seeing a few steps in front of you and you gotta kinda piece it together as you get along. Does that make sense? [00:27:45] Speaker A: Yeah, it makes sense. [00:27:47] Speaker B: Wisdom, to me, being ruled by wisdom feels like it's so much more. I feel like in the past there has been more wisdom at the top. But you know, of my general distrust for a government, especially one that's as big as ours. I guess I'm kind of just like. I think that this has to be done in our communities, in our wards, in our homes, even in a state level. Right. I think that being ruled and guided and living our lives to wisdom has to be, you can't just reject all information out there because there's a lot of good information out there too, but instead learning how to navigate it. [00:28:31] Speaker A: Well, you're a big free speech advocate and we've had discussions and talks about that before and I respect that a lot because how do you know? Getting those ideas out there, expressing where people are coming from, at least gives me an opportunity to see it for what it's worth, whether it's right or whether it's wrong. But it's hard for me to know if it's wrong, if I haven't even heard it before. At least we have that discussion and that opportunity to kind of bring that up and arrive to some conclusion. [00:29:00] Speaker B: Yeah, correct. [00:29:01] Speaker A: The other thing I was thinking about when I was thinking about this is studies show that religious people tend to live longer, live happier, have a better quality of life than people that aren't religious. And this is coming from a scientific perspective. And, I mean, you look at some of the bias that's involved in this, and people of a religious background tend to make different health choices, tend to have stronger family connections, tend to make different choices when it comes to relationships that offer maybe stability and longer life. And so I'm thinking from purely a scientific perspective, why aren't more scientists trying to push religion, regardless of faith, regardless of God, just from a quality of life standpoint, if you want to live longer, you want to live healthier, go and believe in something because it's going to help you. But you see this from a bias. A lot of scientific people are also approaching religion from some of the downsides that they bring. Look at some of the closed mindedness, the not being willing to accept people, the lack of tolerance. [00:30:10] Speaker B: Look at, or even the rejection of science in some ways. [00:30:14] Speaker A: Right? [00:30:14] Speaker B: Like age of the earth. Or, you know, the, I mean, like you, we've talked about, you brought up about how even, like in the history. History, it's like, oh, the earth revolves or the sun revolves around the earth and stuff like that, how within religious communities, sometimes we don't accept that we can be getting pure information outside of simply just a prophet. [00:30:36] Speaker A: Yeah. I mean, you look at the inquisition, you look at the Salem witch trials, you look at the crusades, you look at how much religion has impacted things negatively. And like you said, you talk about creationism, you talk about all these different things that push back against science, and it creates almost this unhealthy lack of understanding on either side of the deal. I think sometimes we lack wisdom on either side. And I feel like God has poured out his wisdom all over the earth to try to speak to us and letting wisdom rule over us as being able to hear his voice. So I just wanted to kind of close that thought. Up in Mosiah 821, it says, yea, there is a wild flock which fleeth from the shepherd and scattereth and are driven and are devoured by the beasts of the forest. And I think God has poured out his wisdom not just on a prophet today that speaks with the voice of the Lord, saying, this is thus saith the Lord, but also to the person who's studying something that they're trying to understand. And the Lord helps them see things differently. And because that's their focus and that's what they're working on, they bring to light new concepts. They bring to light wisdom wherever it may be. It reminds me of there was not a more God fearing people than the Jews, who knew the scriptures better than the Jews did, who observed the law better than the Jews, and yet they couldn't hear the voice of the Lord when it spoke to him, and they crucified their savior. Do we? Sometimes, I think that's apt in the verse, we won't let wisdom rule over. Sometimes we fear the word of the Lord in the many different ways it speaks to us, whether it's from the prophet at the pulpit or from the scientists studying, or from maybe just a humble person on the street who happens to have some wisdom from the Lord that they bring to us. How do we accept that wisdom and hear it rather than fear it and run away from it in whatever form it takes on love it. [00:32:36] Speaker B: I think that's very wise of you to suggest that. You do see that sometimes where we start digging in our heels so much, and we kind of talked about this already, where, you know, we get very emotionally positioned with things especially touchy subjects, politics, religion, you know, social ideas, the things that we believe on a very moral level affect us, and we need to be. I agree with you that I think that we need to be a lot more open to the idea that, yeah, there are scientific discoveries that are going to help unlock the mysteries of heaven just as much as somebody over the pulpit giving us that advice. Why would we want to reject all of the ways that God can communicate? And I think my bow that I would want to put on it is the reason we shouldn't have to be afraid of that, is that if we've already cultivated a relationship, communication with God through the Holy Ghost, we don't need to be afraid of information coming at us, because we'll have already learned how to really sift through that stuff effectively and know what information is good, what information isn't. And therefore, if there's really great information coming to confirm things from a scientific standpoint, sweet. If there's a beautiful sermon coming from somebody outside of our religion. But the spirit confirms the truthfulness. It's like, sweet like that, doesn't, it doesn't mean anything other than God has so many ways that he can communicate with us, be in touch with the Holy Ghost, do what we need to do right, to have that, be a constant companion, and then from there use that as kind of our compass. That would be my only thought. [00:34:30] Speaker A: Yeah. Joseph Smith said his greatest challenge was that the revelations of God were constantly enrolling before his eyes and how to make them known to the saints. And if he were to reveal them to the saints, they would reject half of them. [00:34:44] Speaker B: There you go. We appreciate you listening. Thanks for being patient with us this week. The past couple weeks we've really just been kind of in our transition period of trying to figure out how to get technology to allow us to continue to do our podcast. We have a couple more in studio episodes before jason's out, but we are. We spent a few hours today and failed getting our link set up to do this remotely. But we will have it all sorted out hopefully within the next couple weeks. So we can keep bringing this to you. You can get a hold of us the email address high deepdive.com. [00:35:18] Speaker A: We love you. [00:35:18] Speaker B: We appreciate you. Until next week. [00:35:19] Speaker A: See ya.

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Talking about heroes the Lord would raise up to deliver Israel. We talk about Ehud, Gideon, Deborah and Samson. Unfortunately, …

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March 25, 2024 01:16:45
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Easter 2024

Death and destruction necessary for life and rebirth. Baptism as being born again. Teaching our children freely. Easter episode from 2023.

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